Oats

Doubting Thomas Farms rolled oats and oat berries (groats) are tops in nutrition! They excel in providing antioxidants, dietary fiber, and the enzymes that fight diabetes. They're loaded with manganese, molybdenum and phosphorus, as well as other critical nutrients - Vitamin B1, Magnesium, Chromium, Zinc, and protein. 


Mushrooms

Chanterelle

Nutritional benefits: contain vitamin C and potassium, and one of the richest known sources of vitamin D.

Flavor: Nutty dense meaty mushroom, with an aroma of apricots or peaches.

How to use: Cut them into hunks of a generous size, this will allow for better appreciation of flavor. Tasty compounds in chanterelles are fat-soluble, which is why they are more delicious cooked in fat like butter or olive oil (at low temperatures). Chanterelles are eaten raw by few, because the flavor can make some people ill. Their fine flavor can only be appreciated when they are thoroughly cooked.

They are best served in dishes with relatively mild ingredients that let their complexity come through.

Cleaning: When cleaning chanterelles a toothbrush or nylon mushroom brush works well to whisk away any surface material. To clean any sand or dirt caught in the gills, brush them under a slow running faucet. Do not soak them. Less water is better and then pat dry with a paper towel.

How to store: Keep chanterelles unwashed in waxed paper or brown paper bag in fridge until they are cleaned.

 

Chicken of the Woods

Nutritional benefits: High in protein.

Flavor: Meaty texture and flavor reminiscent of lemon and chicken. Some think it tastes like chicken, because it takes on flavors of the dish and makes a great substitute for meat in almost any dish.

How to use: Some people can have an adverse reaction to this mushroom, it is advised to try a small amount the first time. Cut into smaller pieces (or in thin strips) for easier cooking. Can be blanched, sautéed, fried, or baked. Unless deep-frying, use little oil because they can absorb the oil easily.

Chicken of the woods make great substitution for chicken or tofu. They are great in curries, rice recipes, risottos, casseroles, or any egg dish.

Cleaning: Wiping them down with a slightly damp paper is best, they can become easily waterlogged.

How to store: Keep chicken of the woods unwashed in a paper bag in the fridge, up to a week.

 

Crimini (baby bella)

Nutrition: Great source of B12.

Flavor: Deliciously earthy flavor and meaty texture.

How to use: low moisture content, crimini mushrooms are great for sautéing.

Cleaning: Criminis can be washed before cooking, this can be done by wiping them clean with a damp paper towel. Do not soak them in water.

How to store: Keep crimini mushrooms unwashed in a paper bag in the fridge; avoid wrapping in plastic.

 

Hen of the Woods (Maitake)

Nutrition: Great source of vitamin D and antioxidants.

Flavor: Firm in texture with a strong earthy aroma, providing a bold flavor, with a slight nutty flavor.

How to use: Can be batter and used for tempura, great sliced on pizza, or sautéed. Hen of the woods is also great when cut into big chunks (floret like). Then seared or roasted with butter (or olive oil) until the edges crisp up and the core becomes tender.

Cleaning: Wiping them down with a slightly damp paper is best, they can become easily waterlogged.

How to store: Keep hen of the woods unwashed in a paper bag in the fridge.

 

Lobster

Nutrition: Good source of iron.

Flavor: Meaty and dense mushroom with a nutty flavor, and a smell reminiscent of steamed lobster. Be careful to not overcook or sweet aroma can be lost.

How to use: Best when sautéed with butter (or olive oil). Make sure not to overcook or flavor could be lost, so keep close eye when cooking.

Cleaning: When cleaning lobster mushrooms dirt and sand can get caught in small crevasses. Use a toothbrush or a nylon mushroom brush.

How to store: Keep unwashed lobster mushrooms in a paper bag in the fridge.

 

King Trumpet

Nutrition: Excellent source of Vitamin D, Niacin (Vitamin B3), and Ergothioeine (amino acid).

Flavor: Meaty and firm texture with a mild and elegant taste.

How to use: Roasting in oven for roughly 50 minutes, turning the trumpet every so often. Our favorite way to cook king trumpets is slicing into coins and sautéing in butter (or olive oil).

Cleaning: When cleaning king trumpets light clean with a damp paper towel.

How to store: Keep unwashed king trumpets in a paper bag in the fridge.

 

Oyster

Nutrition: Good source of protein, Thiamin (water-soluble Vitamin B), Vitamin B6, Folate, Iron, Magnesium, Zinc and Manganese. Great source for dietary fiber, Riboflavin, Niacin (Vitamin B3), Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5,) Phosphorus, Potassium, and Copper.

Flavor: Meatier flavor

How to use: Can be blanched, sautéed, fried, or added to a creamy soup. If too much liquid is added the oyster mushroom can turn a bit slimy.

Cleaning: Clean with a damp paper towel.

How to store: Keep unwashed oyster mushroom in a paper bag in the fridge.

 

Shiitake

Nutrition: Great source of Vitamin B and Vitamin D. Some health benefits might include aid in weight loss, support cardiovascular health, improve energy levels and brain function, reduce inflammation, and support immune system.

Flavor: Stocks are woody and can add nice intense flavors to soup, but might be too intense for stir-fries. Stocks are firm and the caps are bit chewy.

How to use: Shiitake can be used in stir-fries, soups, pizza toppings, or pasta. Dried Shiitake is a very prized in Asian culture and adds an intense flavor to soups or pasta.

Undercooked or raw shiitake can cause rashes, so cook with caution.

Cleaning: Clean with a damp paper towel.

How to store: Keep unwashed Shiitake in a paper bag in the fridge.

 

Wild Hedgehog (Lion’s Mane)

Nutrition: Lion’s mane has been used to promote digestive health, including improving stomach and liver function and liver protection. Some studies have also shown that Lion’s Mane can help with memory and mental function.

Flavor: Meaty and dense mushroom. When cooked with butter lobster or crab flavor is intensified.

How to use: Best when sautéed with butter, but is a great substitution for any meat. When sautéing the Lion’s Mane gives off a lot of moisture and the butter should be added later.

Cleaning: Use a toothbrush or nylon mushroom to clean dirt and sand off Lion’s Mane, use as little water as possible. Cut the ends off that contain dirt or remnants from the tree.

How to store: Keep unwashed lion’s mane in a paper bag in the fridge.